New Sweet and Savory Treats at Macrina 

Not much beats the sampling of potential new products at Macrina Bakery. The only tricky part is choosing which of the still warm samples is best and should become a regular offering. But the hard choices have been made, and we’re proud to say the creative work put in by Leslie Mackie, our pastry team, and our bakers has yielded some of the best new products we’ve offered in years.

Organic Whole Wheat Bun 

Perfect for juicy burgers or pulled pork sandwiches, this soft bun gets a slight toasted-nut flavor from an organic whole grain flour from Walla Walla and a gentle sweetness from agave syrup. Grill or toast it to caramelize the interior. The buns are sold in four-packs with a recipe card for a slow-cooked pulled pops sandwich with mango cabbage salsa—an exceptional way to enjoy this hearty bun.

Cheese Bagel 

Our MadRy Sourdough Bagels topped with a combination of white cheddar, parmesan and fresh herbs. The hint of rye in the bagel complements the bold flavor of the cheese. Sold individually or in four-packs, this cheese bagel is excellent toasted for a BLT or as a flavorful base for a scrambled egg and ham breakfast sandwich.

Almond Pinwheel 

Our flaky cornetto dough layered with frangipane—a velvety almond cream—rolled into a pinwheel and topped with sliced almonds and powdered sugar. Crisp, sweet edges and an interior loaded with toasted sliced almond flavor. An almond croissant—Macrina style.

Savory Pinwheels 

Caramelized sweet onions, parmesan, olive oil, and a mix of sesame, fennel and poppy seeds are folded into our flaky cornetto dough and rolled into a pinwheel. The savory pinwheels were the first to vanish from trays of samples, and the surprise standout among our tasters. Savory, but with a gentle sweetness from the onions, these are perfect for a savory breakfast or lunch with a bowl of soup or salad.

Great Pizza, As You Like It: Our Rustic Ready-To-Bake Pizzas are designed to be customized to your taste. 

“Years ago, we offered a pizzetta in our cafés, and it was a customer favorite,” says Leslie. “This is an adaptation from that, and I’ve been really loving this new version,” says Leslie. “We made it simple so you can dress it up with your favorite toppings at home. Lately, for me, it’s been prosciutto and roasted asparagus. But it’s also great just as it is.”

Our Rustic Ready-To-Bake Pizzas come frozen, and you can store them until the need for a quick meal or the impulse for great pizza strikes you. This is not your typical frozen pizza. The flavorful crust is formed from our Giuseppe dough and topped with our house tomato sauce, high-quality mozzarella and Parmesan. Baked, the crust is delicately crisp, and the sauce bubbles through just-browned cheese. That’s the baseline, without any added toppings.

Here are three more of Leslie’s favorite combos:

• Thinly sliced heirloom tomatoes, a drizzle of pesto, torn basil leaves, dash of extra virgin olive oil, sprinkle of coarse salt.

• Roasted asparagus, shaved Parmesan, truffle oil, chopped thyme and Italian parsley

•  Italian sausage, roasted red pepper, grated Parmesan, drizzle of balsamic reduction

Our Rustic Ready-To-Bake Pizzas bake in 15–18 minutes, depending on how many toppings you add, and feed two with a salad. They’re available at any of our cafés.

May Recipe of the Month: Breakfast Frittata with Country Biscuits & Conserve

May is the month of Mother’s Day—Sunday, May 9th, this year. If you’re searching for brunch ideas, try my favorite Mother’s Day meal: a potato, prosciutto and rosemary frittata served with country biscuits and fruit conserve. You bake it in a Dutch oven, which presents beautifully at the table. The creamy country biscuits paired with Project Barnstorm conserve (my handmade fruit conserve made on Vashon Island with local fruit) provides a sweet treat to complement the savory frittata.

-Leslie Mackie

Ingredients:
Serves 4

3 medium pink potatoes
2 Tbsp olive oil
2 tsp fresh rosemary, coarsely chopped 1 tsp kosher salt, divided
½ tsp black pepper, divided
3 oz prosciutto, thinly sliced
6 eggs
¼ cup half and half
¼ cup water
2 tsp chives, finely chopped
⅓ cup grated Parmesan, divided
2 Tbsp unsalted butter
4 Macrina Country Biscuits
1 jar Project Barnstorm conserve

Directions:

Preheat oven to 375°F and line a rimmed baking sheet with parchment.

Thinly slice the potatoes and place in a medium bowl with the olive oil and rosemary. Toss to evenly coat the potatoes in the oil. Spread in a single- layer on the prepared baking sheet. Season with ¼ tsp salt and ¼ tsp pepper. Roast in the oven for 18–20 minutes or until the potatoes are tender. Let cool.

Cut the prosciutto crosswise into ½-inch strips.

In a medium bowl, crack the eggs and add the half and half, water, chives, ¼ cup Parmesan and remaining salt and pepper. Mix well and set aside.

Reduce oven to 350°F.

Place a Dutch oven or cast- iron pan over medium heat. Melt the butter in the pan, coating the bottom to prevent the frittata from sticking. Add the cooked potatoes, sliced prosciutto and use a wooden spoon to spread them evenly. When the prosciutto starts to sizzle around the edges, add the egg mixture. Cook until the eggs begin to form a golden-brown edge, 5–7 minutes. Top with the remaining Parmesan and bake in the oven for 12–15 minutes or until the eggs are set in the middle of pan. Let cool for 5 minutes.

While the oven is still on, heat up the biscuits for 5–8 minutes.

Cut the frittata into four portions. Serve from the pan at the table. Present the warm biscuits on a tray with the conserve.

Any leftovers can be refrigerated for up to 1 day. Enjoy!Preheat oven to 375°F and line a rimmed baking sheet with parchment.

Thinly slice the potatoes and place in a medium bowl with the olive oil and rosemary. Toss to evenly coat the potatoes in the oil. Spread in a single- layer on the prepared baking sheet. Season with ¼ tsp salt and ¼ tsp pepper. Roast in the oven for 18–20 minutes or until the potatoes are tender. Let cool.

Cut the prosciutto crosswise into ½-inch strips.

In a medium bowl, crack the eggs and add the half and half, water, chives, ¼ cup Parmesan and remaining salt and pepper. Mix well and set aside.

Reduce oven to 350°F.

Place a Dutch oven or cast- iron pan over medium heat. Melt the butter in the pan, coating the bottom to prevent the frittata from sticking. Add the cooked potatoes, sliced prosciutto and use a wooden spoon to spread them evenly. When the prosciutto starts to sizzle around the edges, add the egg mixture. Cook until the eggs begin to form a golden-brown edge, 5–7 minutes. Top with the remaining Parmesan and bake in the oven for 12–15 minutes or until the eggs are set in the middle of pan. Let cool for 5 minutes.

While the oven is still on, heat up the biscuits for 5–8 minutes.

Cut the frittata into four portions. Serve from the pan at the table. Present the warm biscuits on a tray with the conserve.

Any leftovers can be refrigerated for up to 1 day. Enjoy!

Now Serving: Rustic Ready-To-Bake Pizza

Our growing line of grab-and-go savory items has given our customers a quick and easy way to put healthy, flavorful meals together. Our newest item is a Rustic Ready-To-Bake Pizza. 

This is not your typical frozen pizza! We form the crisp and flavorful crust from our Giuseppe dough and top it with our house tomato sauce, mozzarella and parmesan. 

Years ago, we offered a pizzetta in our cafés, and it was a customer favorite,” says Leslie. This is an adaptation from that, and Ive been really loving this new version,” says Leslie. We made it simple so you can dress it up with your favorite toppings at home. Lately, for me, its been prosciutto and roasted asparagus. But it’s also great just as it is.” 

The pizza bakes in 15–18 minutes, depending on how many toppings you add, and feeds two. 

Chocolate Raspberry Cupcake Mix

These muffins will please all of your chocolate cake-loving friends, even the most discerning gourmand. We modeled the cake on our ever-popular Moms Chocolate Cake, a mainstay at Macrina almost from day one. The raspberry and cream filling in the center is what makes them unforgettable. 

Many years ago, when we started selling cupcakes, Leslie scooped out the centers and filled them with custard, fruit or lemon curd. The simple twist became a Macrina tradition. After baking these cupcakes, you scoop out a small cavity in the center of each and add raspberry jam, fresh raspberries and raspberry swirl whipped cream. Then you top them with a chocolate ganache frosting, crystal sugar, and fresh raspberries. Half the delight is waiting for your guests to find the whipped cream and raspberry center. 

Our kit includes slightly oversized cupcake molds that give them a unique shape, setting them apart not only in taste but also in appearance from their store-bought cousins.  

With the exception of whipping cream and fresh raspberries, the items you supply can be found in most kitchens. Our cupcake mix makes these elegant festive cupcakes easy to make. Theyre suitable for any celebration—dinner parties, birthdays, Valentines Day, Mothers Day, or just a rainy day treat. 

Enjoy! 

Homegrown: Slow Food, Served Fast, Wherever You Are 

According to Calvin and Hobbes, “There’s an inverse relationship between how good something is for you, and how much fun it is.” Some might say a similar rule holds true when it comes to food. Exceptions prove the rule.

Homegrown, which opened in 2009 and now has ten restaurants throughout the Seattle area, is one of those exceptions. The trifecta of taste, health, and sustainability come together in their reasonably priced meals. They’ve made it fun to eat responsibly!

Childhood friends and Homegrown founders Brad Gillis and Ben Friedman are environmentalists at heart. They also love to gather with friends around great-tasting food. They built their business around these passions— call it sandwich environmentalism.

Now, Homegrown has taken that ethos and delivered it—literally—to your home. You can get a sandwich, but much more, too. Homegrown Goods offers a selection of ready-to-eat meals, fresh 20-minute-meal kits, and a handpicked selection of groceries for those that want to throw their own thing together.

“Everything we sell is backed by our quality standards,” says Brad. “We run every purchase thorough our sourcing standards and make sure we feel comfortable with what we’re buying.”

Homegrown Goods has its own fleet of delivery vans and drivers. They pack chilled items with ice packs, and everything arrives in a sealed box. You are notified by text when your delivery arrives. Your food is delivered one to two days after you order, on a day of your choosing. Delivery areas include much of Seattle and the Eastside, and their delivery area continues to expand.

Since Homegrown Goods launched last summer, high demand for everything has encouraged them to expand their line of offerings. Now you can choose from more than a dozen different meal options on any given day, but Brad expects to more than double the selection.

Whether it’s a Turkey, Bacon, Avocado sandwich or a Farmstead Cobb salad at one of their locations, or a Mediterranean Salmon Bowl from Homegrown Goods, food sourcing is central to Homegrown’s mission. They select the best growers and producers in each category from each region with a twin focus on deliciousness and what’s good for the planet. At Macrina, we’re proud to have our bread featured in many of their sandwiches and available through Homegrown Goods.

 

Food is one of the most vital connections we each have to our planet. What sustains us should also be produced sustainably. We have great admiration for the leadership role Homegrown has taken in their effort to change the food system, so it’s not just healthy for us, but for the planet too. Homegrown does the research so you don’t have to—and with tasty options delivered to your home or served up at one of their many locations, they make it easy—and fun—to do something that is good for you, and, well, just good.

April Recipe of the Month: Coconut Cream Cake with Fresh Berries

This luscious layer cake is a lovely treat for spring holidays like Easter and Mother’s Day. It has flavor and beauty in spades. The whipped cream functions as a frosting, the toasted coconut adds texture and taste while the juicy berries add color and some tartness to the sweet cake. The cake is best enjoyed the day you make it, but it will keep for up to two days in the refrigerator.

-Leslie Mackie

Ingredients:
Makes one 9-inch layer cake

3 cups unsweetened shredded coconut
1 cup coconut milk
5 egg whites
2 tsp almond extract, divided
2 tsp vanilla extract, divided
2¼ cups cake flour
2 cups granulated sugar, divided
1 Tbsp + 1 tsp baking powder
1 tsp salt
12 Tbsp (1½ sticks) unsalted butter, room temperature
1 cup strawberries, sliced
1 cup blueberries
1 cup raspberries
2 cups heavy cream

Directions:

Preheat oven to 325°F. Prepare a 9-inch x 3-inch springform cake pan by brushing it with oil and lining the bottom and sides with parchment paper.

Spread the coconut evenly onto a rimmed baking sheet. Toast in the oven, tossing every 3 minutes until golden brown, about 5 to 10 minutes. Remove from the oven, place in a medium bowl and let cool.

In a separate medium bowl, combine the wet ingredients: coconut milk, egg whites, 1 tsp almond extract and 1 tsp vanilla extract. Mix well and set aside.

Sift the cake flour, 1¾ cup sugar, baking powder and salt into the bowl of a stand mixer. Add 1 cup of toasted coconut. Using the paddle attachment, mix at low speed for about 30 seconds. Cut the butter into ½-inch cubes. Scatter half the butter cubes over the surface of the flour mixture. Mix on low speed. After 1 minute, add the remaining butter cubes. Continue on low speed until the mixture has a texture that is coarse and crumbly, with no visible lumps of butter.

Add half the wet ingredients and mix at medium speed for 30 seconds. Stop the mixer and scrape down the sides of the bowl with a rubber spatula. Add the remaining wet ingredients. Mix on medium speed for another 30 seconds.

Pour the batter into the prepared springform pan. Bake on a center rack for about 1 hour or until the top is golden brown and a toothpick comes out clean. Let cool for 1 hour. Remove the cake from the pan and remove the parchment paper.

If the cake is slightly domed, cut the raised part off so the top is flat. Then, using a good serrated knife, carefully cut the cake into two horizontal layers. They will be fragile, so handle them gently. Stack them on each other to keep them from drying out.

Place the sliced strawberries, blueberries and raspberries in a bowl and stir them gently together. Set aside.

In the bowl of a stand mixer, add the heavy cream, ¼ cup sugar, 1 tsp almond extract and 1 tsp vanilla extract. With the whip attachment, start mixing at low speed, then increase to medium and continue until medium-firm peaks form.

To assemble, place the bottom layer on a serving dish. Spread 1½ cups of whipped cream evenly over the top. Lay three-quarters of the berries over the whipped cream in a single layer covering the entire top surface. Add the second cake layer and spread the remaining whipped cream over the top and sides of the cake and wipe any excess off the edge of your serving dish.

Press the remaining toasted coconut to the edge of the cake (you can cover the top, too, if you like the look). Garnish the top with the remaining berries. Refrigerate the cake until you’re ready to serve it. Enjoy!

Solidarity with the Asian Community

The alarming rise of pandemic-related racism against Asian Americans has contributed to an increase in hate crimes, including the horrific shootings in Atlanta. At Macrina, we are proud of our diverse crew, which includes many people of Asian descent, Vietnam in particular. We stand together against hate, intolerance, and racism. Macrina employee, Michelle Galvin, a fourth-generation Japanese American, shares some of her troubling experiences and a plea for kindness in these difficult times.

Over the past year, Covid has changed all our lives dramatically. With changes to how we socialize, work and even buy our groceries, life has been different and difficult. For those of us, like myself, who are of Asian descent, an additional challenge has been contending with heightened bias and discrimination.

Living in Seattle for my adult life has been a blessing. I grew up right outside of Chicago. As a child, my schoolmates regularly taunted me. They called me “Ching Chong Chinaman,” and made fun of the rice balls I brought for lunch. Our next-door neighbors, a family with three boys, said I was the reason for WWII. They blamed me for their grandfather’s death. I was six.

Moving to Marysville, WA, in my teenage years was liberating. Though I was one of the only Asian kids in school, I never experienced racism like I had in Illinois. Years later, as an adult living in the Seattle area, I was relieved my four children would not experience the sort of racism I did. And it has been better, much better. Still, we talk about how irritating it is when people ask us where we are from and when we answer Seattle, they say, no, where are you really from. And once a parent of a kid in my daughter’s first-grade class asked me if I was Mia or Gracie’s mom—she could never tell us people apart, she said. (My daughter, Gracie, asked me at the time if it was because her glasses were broken.) Despite the occasional challenge, my children have always felt comfortable and proud of their Japanese heritage.

One of our family’s favorite places is the International District. We visit at least once weekly —grocery shopping at Uwajimaya, dumplings at Dough Zone or pastries at Fuji Bakery. When the International District was vandalized earlier this summer, it broke my heart. As if Covid and quarantine weren’t enough of a challenge to our beloved restaurants and shops in that neighborhood! Rising hate crimes against Asians have added to the struggle. It brought tears to my eyes to have to tell my teenage children that it was not a good idea for them to go to the International District by themselves to get Boba in the evening because it is not safe.

We have always prided ourselves on the welcoming work environment at Macrina. There is truly no place here for hate, discrimination, or racism. Our head baker, Phuong Hoang Bui, has been at Macrina nearly since we opened, and he embodies the spirit of the Macrina community as much as anyone. His daughter, Amy Bui, who ran around our Belltown café at the age of three is now our general manager of wholesale sales. A great many of our bakers are Vietnamese. They are who we are.

We want to be sure the Asian community knows that we stand with them. We condemn the hate crimes and casual racism that are happening in our community against our Asian friends, employees, customers and peers. Macrina is a long-time supporter of Helping Link and the Vietnamese community. Most importantly, we hope to spread a message of kindness during these difficult times.

-Michelle Galvin

March Recipe of the Month: Corned Beef & Cabbage Slaw Breakfast Tartine

We make our challah bread in the European Jewish tradition. The braided loaf is enriched with egg, honey-sweetened and baked until the crust is firm and golden mahogany in color. The soft, tight crumb pulls apart easily.

Our challah is a customer favorite for French toast or enjoyed with butter and jam. This recipe uses thick slices, pan-toasted in butter, for an open-faced tartine sandwich. The tender, lightly sweet bread adds a complementary texture and flavor to the combination of corned beef, Swiss cheese, whole-grain mustard and a fresh cabbage slaw with carrots and pears.

-Leslie MackieIngredients:
Serves 4

¼ cup whole-grain mustard, divided
2 Tbsp mayonnaise
2½ tsp apple cider vinegar
1½ tsp honey
¼ tsp kosher salt
¼ tsp cracked black pepper
½ head green cabbage (medium-size)
1 carrot, peeled
1 Bartlett pear
2 Tbsp Italian parsley, coarsely chopped
1 loaf Macrina Challah Bread
6 Tbsp unsalted butter, divided
8 slices corned beef (approx. 6 oz)
4 slices Swiss cheese (approx. 4 oz)
8 eggs

Directions:

Preheat oven to 325°F and line a rimmed baking sheet with parchment paper.

In a medium bowl, place 1 Tbsp + 1 tsp whole-grain mustard, mayonnaise, apple cider vinegar and honey. Whisk to combine. Set aside.

Remove the tough root of the cabbage by cutting a V-shaped wedge from the base. Lay the half cabbage on the cut side and cut it into ⅛-inch slices. Using the medium side of a grater, grate the carrot. Cut the pear in half, remove the core and grate the pear with the same grater. Add the cabbage, carrot, pear, parsley, salt and black pepper to the dressing. Toss to combine. Set aside to marinate for 15 minutes.

Cut the challah on the bias into eight 1-inch thick pieces.

In a large sauté pan, melt 3 Tbsp butter. Over medium-high heat, sauté the challah slices on both sides for 1 to 2 minutes until just browning. Place on the lined baking sheet. Divide the remaining whole-grain mustard between the slices and spread evenly. Top each with a slice of corned beef. Cut the cheese slices in half and place a piece on each tartine.

Bake the tartines for 3 to 5 minutes to melt the cheese. Place 2 tartines on each serving plate.

In a nonstick pan over medium heat, melt 2 tsp butter. When the butter is sizzling, sauté 2 eggs at a time, flipping when whites are set and cooking to your desired preference (over- easy, over-medium or over-hard). Salt and pepper to taste. Finish cooking the remaining eggs, adding more butter as needed. Top each tartine with 1 egg. Divide the cabbage slaw evenly across the 8 tartines.

You might consider serving these with a Guinness or your favorite craft beer in honor of the Irish. Happy St. Patrick’s Day!

Printable PDF of this recipe here.

Meet Marc Mitchell: Food Safety AM

At heart, Marc Mitchell is a baker. He studied at Le Cordon Bleu before coming to work at Macrina Bakery in 2013. Marc started on our bread team before moving to wholesale pastry, where he took on leadership roles. But when the position of Food Safety AM opened up late in 2020, Marc’s skills made him a natural fit for the job. He applied and got it.

Not only is he intimately familiar with the various departments, but also with the people, processes and the vital importance of food safety. Like any great pastry chef, Marc is very attentive to detail, which serves him well in his new role. Working closely with Blake Gehringer, Macrina’s Production Manager, Marc oversees every element of food safety at our bakery and cafés. He spends his days training, answering questions, observing, documenting, testing and continuously learning.

One of Marc’s challenges is teaching employees whose first language isn’t English. But Marc has transcended the challenge by learning some Vietnamese, getting translation help when needed, visual aids and frequently demonstrating the proper procedure. “I teach by showing,” he says.

Raised in Washington state to a Filipino mother and American father, Marc learned to love Filipino food. When he’s not working, he and his wife (also Filipino) love to cook chicken adobo and other classic Filipino dishes.

As a kid, Marc learned to work on cars with his father, who sadly is no longer with us. The passion continues, and in his free time, Marc can often be found tinkering under the hood. Pressed on his dream car, Marc thinks a moment, then says, “Ferrari 458 Italia. It’s very nice, but not too bad on the pocket—as Ferraris go.”